Dispatches from the U.S.S. DeKalb: March 1, 1918

Source: C. Gilbert Hazlett, March 1, 1918

Source: C. Gilbert Hazlett, March 1, 1918

March 1, 1918

Arose 7 A.M. Life preservers uniform of the day. Turned to 8 A.M.

In war zone today. Weather cold. Have not yet met destroyers for our convoy.

Sat down to mess at 4.30.

Bell rang “Torpedo Defense,” and whistle on Huntington and Covington shrieked a warning to all the other ships. A dark object, said to have been the periscope of a submarine was showing, about 1-1/2 feet out of water, and between Huntington and this ship.

All ships immediately commenced to zig-zag; the Huntington fired with her 6-inch guns, and headed directly for it. But the “Covington” was also headed for it, and, to avoid collision, both changed courses slightly.

The “George Washington” then fired several shots, all shots being close, and the object was constantly submerging, and at last disappeared entirely.

Over a dozen shots were fired, most of which were possible hits.

On account of not having torpedo boat destroyers with us, all ships speeded up immediately.

This ship’s guns were all manned, and the crews just itching to get the command to fire, but could not come within range on account of the dangers of hitting one of the other ships.

All ships continued at maximum speed during night.

Turned in at 8 P.M.

Source: C. Gilbert Hazlett, March 1, 1918

Source: C. Gilbert Hazlett, March 1, 1918

Source: C. Gilbert Hazlett, March 1, 1918

Source: C. Gilbert Hazlett, March 1, 1918

Source: C. Gilbert Hazlett, March 1, 1918

Source: C. Gilbert Hazlett, March 1, 1918

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About Sean Patrick Hazlett

Conservative clean energy crusader, national security hawk, financial analyst, engineer, and former military officer.
This entry was posted in Blogging, Defense, Leadership, Policy, Politics, War, World War I and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Dispatches from the U.S.S. DeKalb: March 1, 1918

  1. Martin L. Shoemaker says:

    Heating up!

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